Part of the Greenwood Dale Foundation Trust group of Academies

Technology

technology

Introduction

Design and Technology offers a unique opportunity in the curriculum for pupils to identify and solve real problems by designing and making products in a wide range of contexts relating to their personal interests. Design and Technology develops pupils' interdisciplinary skills, and their capacity for imaginative, innovative thinking, creativity and independence.

Design and technology is essentially a practical subject involving the combination of skills with knowledge and understanding in order to design and make quality products. Pupils’ have the opportunity to analyse and evaluate situations, design and make products, and then appraise their performance.

In Design and Technology we aim to enable pupils to:

♦ Actively engage in the processes of design and technology to develop as effective and independent learners;

♦ make decisions, consider sustainability and combine skills with knowledge and understanding in order to design and make quality products;

♦ explore ways in which aesthetic, technical, economic, environmental, ethical and social dimensions interact to shape designing and making;

♦ analyse existing products and produce practical solutions to needs, wants and opportunities, recognising their impact on quality of life;

♦ develop decision-making skills through individual and collaborative working;

♦ understand that designing and making reflect and influence cultures and societies, and that products have an impact on lifestyle;

♦ develop skills of creativity and critical analysis through making links between the principles of good design, existing solutions and technological knowledge.

Our vision is to forge strong links with industry in order to inspire our future designers, engineers, technologists and manufacturers; and introduce cutting-edge practice to the classroom by bringing professionals into the classroom and delivering learning through case studies and live briefs related to a real world context. We believe this will provide our pupils with the necessary knowledge for further education in Design and Technology.

In technology we teach courses covering a variety of different disciplines. At Key Stage 3 these are divided into Food, Textiles and Resistant Materials with further specialisms available in Key Stage 4 within areas such as Construction, Engineering and Product Design.

Click on the link below to see what we offer!

Technology Courses for 2015

Key Stage 3

Year 7:

Healthy Eating (Food)

Packaging and Engineering Challenge Projects (Resistant Materials)

Design and make a soft toy (Textiles)

Year 8:

Bread Making (Food)

Metal Critter and Acrylic Pen Grip (Resistant Materials)

Design and make a bag (Textiles)

Year 9:

Pastry making (Food)

Wooden Joints (Resistant Materials)

Design and make shorts (Textiles)

During Key Stage 3, pupils are also taught about:

  • hygiene and safety in the kitchen
  • health and safety in the workshop
  • appropriate use of tools and equipment
  • healthy eating
  • food intolerances.
  • chemical reactions that take place when cooking food
  • design process in order gain a well-made quality product.

Some of the skills developed include:

  • handling of raw foods
  • correct use of food preparation equipment.
  • operating a sewing machine and over locker.
  • application of embellishment techniques such as batik, tie and dye and machine embroidery.

 

Key stage 4

Food Technology (WJEC/CBAC)

This is a two year course - 40% final examination and 60% controlled assessment. Pupils' work will also be marked internally on a regular basis to assess progress.

Areas covered include; handling and preparation of raw materials, correct handling of equipment, awareness of chemical changes in food during preparation/cooking, sensory analysis, product analysis, commercial manufacturing practices, quality control, uses of CAD, legislation and packaging requirements.

Careers in food include: Food Technologist, Buyer, Chef, Food Photographer, Quality Control and Production Manager.

Resistant materials (WJEC/CBAC)

This is a two year course - 40% final examination and 60% controlled assessment. Pupils' work will also be marked internally on a regular basis to assess progress.

Areas covered include; Working extensively with wood, metals and plastics, use of CAD/CAM, learning about commercial production, product analysis, sustainability and past designers.

Textiles Technology (WJEC/CBAC)

This is a two year course - 40% final examination and 60% controlled assessment. Pupils' work will also be marked internally on a regular basis to assess progress.

Areas covered include; Working extensively with fabrics and embellishment techniques, pattern cutting and drafting, machining skills, fashion illustration alongside developing there understanding and awareness of British high street fashion and influences.

BTEC Level 2 Award - Construction and the Built Environment (Edexcel)

The course is comprised of the following units:

Unit 1: Construction Technology

Unit 2: Construction Design

Unit 3: Scientific and Mathematical Applications for Construction

Unit 6: Exploring Carpentry and Joinery Principles and Techniques

75% coursework, 25% examination

Pupils will develop a broad understanding of the construction industry, the types of projects it undertakes and the contribution it makes to wider society. Pupils will also look at how client needs can determine the design of a building. Following this study, students develop their own design ideas to a given brief. Pupils will also learn the fundamentals of low-rise construction techniques and common building materials. A key maths component will strengthen their understanding of the underlying principles that govern successful building construction. In addition to theoretical study, students will also engage with a practical component in which they develop skills in carpentry and joinery by exploring established principles and techniques.

BTEC First Award in Engineering (Edexcel)

In the first year, learners will be expected to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas of engineering:

Unit 1: ‘The Engineering World’, which involves discovering the world of engineering. They will investigate the processes used to manufacture modern products within different engineering sectors.

Unit 2: ‘Investigating an Engineering Product’. In this unit the learner will investigate a manufactured product to learn what considerations a designer would keep in mind when writing a technical specification.

Unit 7: ‘Machining Techniques’ looks at how to select investigate and use machining techniques that involve shaping or forming with loss of volume.

The format of assessment for this programme of study is based around both internal and external methods:

Internal

75% coursework that starts in September and is submitted at varies stages in the year with final completion in June.

External

25% examination which is taken in November/December.

* Pupils who have successfully completed the Award can progress onto the Certificate in Year 11. This qualification features further coursework based around two compulsory units  and one optional unit. An additional written examination is taken in June 2015, worth 25% of the overall grade for the Certificate.

 

Key Stage 5

BTEC Level 3 National Certificate in Engineering (Edexcel)

A one year programme that offers learners an intensive programme of study, learners will be expected to complete a number of mandatory and optional units.

Again, in the first year, learners will be expected to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas of engineering:

Unit 1 Health and Safety in the Engineering Workplace aims to build an understanding of the key features of health and safety legislation and regulations.

Unit 5 Mechanical Principles and Applications aims to give learners the knowledge of mechanical principles and to apply them when solving engineering problems.

Unit 22 Fabrication Processes and Technology aims to give learners the knowledge of processes used to safely measure, mark out, cut, form and assemble fabricated structures using sheet metal.

The format of assessment for this programme of study is based around an internal method:

100% coursework that starts in September and is submitted at varies stages in the year with final completion in June.

* Students who have successfully completed the Certificate can progress onto the Subsidiary Diploma in Year 13. This qualification features further coursework submission based on three additional units.

 

Extra Curricular Opportunities

Key Stage 3 Club

Following on from a successful Engineering workshop that was ran at this year’s Summer School, the engineering team are offering Primary year 6 and Secondary year 7 pupils the opportunity to work on the GreenPower Goblin project.  This is based on a team of students designing and building an electric powered race car, which they will use to compete against other schools at a number of race meeting. There are also opportunities for pupils to attend food and textiles clubs at lunchtimes and afterschool to develop their skills and interest in these areas.

Key stage 4 Club

This year sees the start of our ‘Young Engineers’ programme which allows learners to further develop their skills in engineering problem solving. This club will run one evening a week and will focus on both local and national challenges supported by professional engineers. There are also opportunities for pupils to take part in regional competitions and projects to support their interest and develop their skills in technology.

Key Stage 5 Club

In the Sixth Form, we are offering engineering enthusiasts the opportunity to be part of the GreenPower 24+ Challenge  Project. This is based on a team of students designing and building an electric powered race car, which they will use to compete against other Sixth Forms and colleges at a number of race meetings.